NTAQ: The Henry Matisse and Pablo Picasso Challenge

NTAQ met yesterday and, as always, it was a wonderful meeting of friends and artists.  I am very fortunate to have these guys in my life!
Wendy and I led a workshop on improvisational piecing/strip piecing.  We had everyone cut pieces of black and white paper and arrange them into a pleasing composition.  Their assignment, due at the next meeting, is to create a piece in black and white fabric using the same method of composition.

Our challenge for January was to create an original piece using two paintings for inspiration.  The first is "The Dance" by Henri Matisse, painted in 1910:
The second piece is "Les Demosoilles D'Avignon" by Pablo Picasso, 1907:
We were instructed to pull elements of both pieces into our new composition.  And it was amazing to see how diverse our interpretations were!

Wendy tried to recreate the movement of the dancers' bodies:
This is mine.  I was trying to show sweeping movement and grace:
Kay played with the idea of the dancers moving across the floor:
Rhonda loved the circle of dancers:
Michelle was inspired by the movement and the color palette of the Matisse:
Bethany also loved the circle of dancers.  She pieced her dancers and reverse appliquéd the orange fabric over them:
And here are all of our pieces together.  They are very diverse, yet inspired by the same source.  It always amazes me how different they are!
Our members had been very busy.  Kay showed this piece using her solid indigo dyed fabric and a collection of Asian fabrics.  I'm sorry I didn't get a picture of the back -- it was a piece she had dyed using the itajime (clamped) shibori technique.  Very cool:
Michelle had created a piece using swatches of upholstery fabric:
Wendy showed a color blocked piece:
 We decided to skip the inspiration challenge for February to allow members time to do their "homework" improv piece.


Comments

Jaye Dodds said…
Great blog! I just hate to miss any of our meetings! Hopefully I’ll be up and going by the next one! Love the challenges!